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As part of my ongoing series about cognitive distortions, I’m going address Emotional Reasoning in this post.  Emotional reasoning refers to the mistaken belief that everything you feel must be true.  In this way, we can sometimes trick ourselves into believing that our feelings are facts.  To the contrary, sometimes our emotions cloud our judgement, and we don’t always read the situation correctly when we allow our emotions to affect our interpretation of the situation we are in.  Sometimes we need to step back from our emotional response to a situation and try to see if our emotions are taking us to a conclusion that may not be really true.

Here are some examples of emotional reasoning and thoughts that may occur when you might need to think twice about whether or not what you feel is really true:

 

  1. “ I feel rejected and hurt, and therefore you have rejected me”
  • In this case, someone may or may not have rejected you. A person may have been trying to set boundaries with you by telling you not to call repeatedly when they are unavailable.  Your feelings of rejection may be due to insecurities you have, but you also need to respect the boundaries other people set in their own lives and relationships.  Or perhaps you were passed over for a job offer, and you were one qualified candidate in a competitive position, but fell short of the final cut.  This doesn’t mean the company didn’t think you would have done a good job or that your skill set wasn’t valuable.
  1. “I feel like a bad friend, therefore I must be a bad friend.”
  • Sometimes you may judge yourself too harshly for making a mistake. Being human, you’re bound to do things you regret from time to time, but this doesn’t make you a terrible person.  When you do make mistakes, try to own up to them and repair the damage when you can, but don’t believe that you are defined by every mistake you’ve ever made.
  1. “I feel lonely, therefore no one cares about me”
  • It’s hard to face problems on your own when you don’t have much support from others. However, sometimes we can get to feeling overwhelmed with the prospect of reaching out to others when we feel vulnerable and need support.  Oftentimes, it’s easier to sit with our feelings by ourselves than acknowledge that we need help.  However it’s important to reach out to your support system when you can.  Sometimes, your friends and family may not know that you are struggling, but would want to be there for you if they could.  It’s important when you feel this way to step back from your emotions and try to account for the support that you DO have, even if it’s not in the most likely places.
  1. “I’m angry with you, therefore you must have done something wrong.”
  • Anger is difficult to step back from, but it’s very important that you understand where your anger is coming from and how much control you have over it. Sometimes we get angry with others for things that cause us distress, but often times anger is really a reflection of how we’re feelings about ourselves. For example, you may feel angry at your partner for not doing something you expected from them, but you never actually verbalized what you needed.  You feel angry that your partner didn’t anticipate your needs, but you may not recognize that it was your responsibility to communicate your needs to your partner.
  1. “I feel worthless, therefore I am worthless.”
  • Self-esteem can be a struggle if you have been suffering from a mental illness or have experienced trauma in your life. It can be hard to separate your feelings of low self-worth from your outlook on life, but this is where it’s important to take stock in what your values are.  Sometimes we give other people more courtesy than we give ourselves.  Whenever you find yourself struggling with negative thoughts about yourself, ask yourself who gave you those messages about yourself and if you would say those things to someone that you cared about.  If you wouldn’t tell someone you care about that they are worthless, than you shouldn’t say those things to yourself.  Feeling down or struggling with the situation you are in at this moment doesn’t mean that you have to listen to thoughts that make you feel worse about yourself.

 

Sometimes we get so caught up in our emotions that we choose to ignore evidence that goes against how we feel. So maybe your friend sent you an invitation to an event on Facebook, but because she didn’t reach out personally to make sure you were coming you still choose to believe she doesn’t really care if you come hang out or not.  Or perhaps  you become overwhelmed with a presentation you have to give at work, and take this to mean that you must be in over your head and you’re not cut out for the job, despite the fact that your supervisor picked you for the project.

If you think you might be engaging in emotional reasoning and you want to make sure you are not letting your emotions cloud your judgment of the situation, ask yourself a few questions:

  1. Am I overlooking my strengths?
  2. Am I discounting evidence that would lead me to reach a different conclusion?
  3. Am I basing my conclusions on my emotions or facts?
  4. What would you say to a friend that was in your situation?
  5. Am I struggling to give myself the same advice that I would give to my friend?

These questions will help you evaluate your situation with more clarity and determine if emotional reasoning is getting in the way of your progress.  Emotions are important, and we shouldn’t just ignore them.  But keep in mind that relying on our emotions to guide us doesn’t always give us the full picture of what’s happening and what all of our options are.  Don’t forget that you are in charge of your mentality, even when it gets overwhelming.

For more on Cognitive Distortions, check out the other posts in this series:

Cognitive Distortions 3.0: Personalization

Cognitive Distortions 2.0: Disqualifying the Positive

Coping with Cognitive Distortions: Catastrophizing

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