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If you have a relationship with a toxic person, whether that is a romantic relationship, a friendship, or even a family relationship, you might often find yourself frustrated, drained, and confused about how to handle the situation. It’s hard to know how to set boundaries with people or know when to cut ties with someone that you care about.  You may not recognize how toxic the relationship has become until you take some time to really think about the patterns that have been established.

What Are Toxic Relationships?

Toxic relationships tend to drain your energy, because the patterns of behavior from a toxic person can be confusing, hypocritical, and exhausting.  Some people actually thrive on the conflict and drama that they create in their personal lives.  The reasons why people do this are just as confusing, and usually not worth your time to try and figure out.  It usually has to do with personal insecurity and poor emotional intelligence.  Trying to change the other person or have healthy boundaries can be just as exhausting, because ultimately you can’t change someone who doesn’t want to change, or who doesn’t see the toxic patterns in their own behavior.

There are many signs that the relationship you are in is has become toxic, which means you need to think about changing some things to protect your own mental health and establish healthier relationships with this other person.   Again, this could apply to a friendship, a romantic relationship, or another personal relationship, even a co-worker or supervisor.  The toxic person in your life may not display all of these sings, but they likely will display at least a few of these signs if their pattern of behavior is unhealthy.

Here are 10 things to look out for that indicate you are in a toxic relationship:

1: You get upset at this person, but then you end up apologizing to them for something else entirely. They have a way of turning arguments or disagreements around so that you end up feeling guilty for everything, even things that are not your fault. They rarely take responsibility for their own faults, and when confronted they turn the focus back to the person who is calling out their behavior.

2: You are constantly accommodating their needs, but when you need help or support, they aren’t there for you. Toxic people tend to latch on to other people who are givers and empaths, but they are often not willing to give support back to other people.

3:  They make a lot of promises or agreements, but they rarely follow through with what they say they will do. They are willing to follow through with things that will benefit themselves, but toxic people will not prioritize other people’s needs, so if they see no benefit to themselves, they don’t follow through with their commitments.

4: They are constantly complaining, but they never do anything to change their circumstances.  They may blame everyone else for issues, but never take responsibility for solving their own problems.  You may find yourself caught up in trying to rescue them often or fix their problems for them.  They start to assume that you will be there to fix things for them, and they may even become angry when you don’t fix their problems for them or bail them out from the consequences of their own behaviors.

5:  They may be negative more often than not.  They will avoid doing things because they insist that things will not work.  They may avoid making changes because they always find barriers to making progress or changing their behavior.  Even when you try to cheer them up or point out the positive in situations, they will still shut down any solutions you offer or refuse to acknowledge anything positive.  It can be hard to be around people like this after awhile because they start to negatively affect your mood, too.

6: Toxic people may avoid issues altogether by denying that a problem exists, or avoid hard conversations by just saying they have nothing to say, or giving one-word answers when you are trying to resolve a problem or talk about an issue.  They may also stall, saying that they will do something later, or wait for someone else to do it.

7: You feel like you have to walk on eggshells or watch what you say around this person to avoid an argument or problem.  A toxic person may become highly defensive if you try to raise any issue that you want to talk about. They also may have a tendency to say things that are hurtful or condescending, so you become defensive too, so as not to find yourself under attack in some way.

8: They may expect you to read their mind, or know how they feel at all times, so that when they become upset you may be the one who gets blamed. You may find yourself trying to do the right thing, but no matter what you do, they end up finding fault with something you did or said. Toxic people can be extremely difficult to please, because they expect others to cater to them, yet they will easily find fault in others when mistakes happen or if they don’t get their way.

9: They may ignore your boundaries when you try to set limits with them, but they become upset when you try to enforce those boundaries.  Toxic people feel victimized when other people set boundaries with them, and so even if you try to set healthy boundaries, they may not respect your wishes or accuse you of abandoning them when you try to stick to those limits.

10: They may make fun of you or otherwise say hurtful things, but if you get upset they accuse you of being too sensitive or of not being able to take a joke.  When you stand up for yourself, they distance themselves from you to punish you for doing so. It might seem easier to just let things slide, even when you feel hurt, because trying to address how you feel will just result in an argument or more denials from the toxic person.

There are many other things that toxic people may do that are confusing, hurtful and unhealthy.  Unfortunately it can be hard to set boundaries with people like this, and you may still care about them and want to continue to friendship or relationship.  However, you need to remember that you cannot change another person, especially someone who does not see the need for them to change.

What To Do If You Are In a Toxic Relationship

Sometimes, you may be able to keep the person in your life, but you might have to cut back on how much time you spend with them.  If you are in a romantic relationship with someone who exhibits these patterns, then you really need to consider whether you can continue to tolerate this kind of dynamic in your relationship.  It is possible for people to change, but you might need help from a professional, and your partner has to be willing to look at their own toxic patterns.

If these patterns are present in the workplace, you may not have any choice but to try and find other employment, especially if the person is in a supervisory position over you.  While you always have to carefully weigh your options when it comes to work, staying in a toxic work environment can cause long-term stress and contribute to a decline in your overall mental health and quality of life. When it is a co-worker you have difficulties with, you can try to limit your conversations to work-related issues and avoid contact with them outside of work.

Other times, when it is a family member or a person that you can’t or don’t want to cut out of your life, you have to start to adjust your expectations and limit how much time and energy you give to this toxic person in your life.  Although it can be difficult, you have to ask yourself some hard questions about whether you can continue to spend your emotional energy in a relationship with someone who does not respect your needs or feelings. Setting boundaries and limiting your contact with toxic people are often the best strategies to avoid these relationships have a significant negative effect on your life.

For more information on setting boundaries and emotional intelligence, check out these other posts:

Emotional Intelligence Series: Setting Boundaries

10 Ways to Practice Emotional Intelligence

9 Tips To Deal With Difficult People

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