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Jealousy- it’s not a fun emotion to experience and it’s not exactly something to be proud of.  Jealousy is a feeling of envy and wishing that you had something that someone else has, or even sometimes wishing that something bad would happen to someone who you perceive as having some kind of advantage over you.  Everyone experiences jealousy sometimes, but it’s important to keep it in check to make sure that jealousy doesn’t cause you undue distress or problems in your relationships.

Why Do We Experience Jealousy?

Jealousy is complex, and can be triggered when people feel threatened in some way or have a fear of losing something, such as an important relationship.  It can arise when people are competing for the attention of a third party, or when there is a perception that someone has something you don’t have, including some kind of advantage.  These feelings can be triggered by competition in romantic relationships, family relationships, work relationships and friendships.

Humans can also experience jealousy when competing for resources and social capital.   Social capital just means that certain qualities, such as appearance, financial resources, or personality strengths give people an advantage in the broader society. Our culture is predicated upon people being able to access resources that include things that increase our social and financial capital.  This is why you can feel jealous, for example, if you think someone is more attractive than you, because it seems like they have an unfair advantage in being able to secure romantic partners, receive attention or favors, or even to be treated more respectfully or favorably.

There is plenty of research that backs up how people with certain qualities receive more benefits and advantages because of them. People who are considered conventionally attractive tend to get more job offers, make more money, receive more attention from potential romantic partners, more social acceptance, and even more leniency when in trouble.  People who have more financial resources tend to have more power, fewer social problems, and yes, more leniency when in trouble.  It stands to reason then, that people can look upon others who have these advantages and feel envious that they don’t have the same advantage.

It’s certainly not fair that subjective qualities such as beauty result in more advantages, just as it’s not always fair that objective resources such as money results in other advantages like power or authority or respect.  However, given that we are all going to experience jealousy sometimes and we all have to live in the world as it is, it is worthwhile to gain some control over any tendencies towards jealousy you may have and build more resilience towards negative emotional reactions.

What To Do About Jealousy

While jealousy is a natural emotion to experience, it’s distressful and can take up too much of your emotional energy.  Not only that, it’s also not very productive as an emotional state.  It doesn’t help you improve yourself, it doesn’t help you feel better about yourself, and it doesn’t usually motivate you to work harder on your goals.

It can, however, motivate you to act irrationally, damage your personal relationships, and make you look insecure and petty.

One of the mistakes that I see people make sometimes is that they want someone else to make them feel better when they are feeling jealous.  For example, they want their partner to provide more reassurance to them when they feel jealous of another person, or they might make baseless accusations about what other people are thinking or feeling when in reality their perceptions are rooted in jealousy rather than rational facts.  This can cause damage in relationships because friends or partners get annoyed and fatigued when they have to constantly provide reassurance for reasons that seem irrational or rooted in insecurity and jealousy.

Combatting jealousy involves turning your focus back onto yourself so that you can stop wasting emotional energy on irrational jealousy.  Here are 5 tips on what you can do to combat feelings of jealousy and keep your emotional state in balance:

  1. Practice Gratitude: First and foremost, practicing gratitude daily can help you feel less jealous and more secure.  Increasing the gratitude you have for your life and relationships can help you to feel less threatened by others who may have resources or advantages that you don’t have.  There are always going to be people who have more than you, or advantages that you don’t have.  Yet in reality there is probably a lot that you can feel grateful for and there are others that have less  than you.  There may even be people who are jealous of you, though you might not even know it.  Check out the link above for tips on how to cultivate a gratitude practice
  2. Acknowledge your strengths: While it can seem like other people have strengths, privileges, and advantages, you likely have all of those things too.  Everyone has strengths, and you likely have advantages too in other ways.  Take the time to recognize everything you have that enables you to be successful and helps you to move forward in your life.  Make an inventory of your strengths that includes things that you are good at, what you like about your personality, things that make you unique, ways in which you’ve helped other people in positive ways, challenges that you have overcome, and compliments that you have received.
  3. Check your values: Understanding your values is part of being emotionally intelligent, because your values help to guide your choices and priorities.  Vales can be things like love, family, security, fairness, responsibility, loyalty, and many other qualities that you want to embody in your life.  Values can be helpful when you’re feeling jealous because more than likely being a jealous person isn’t something that you value or want to prioritize in your life. Think about the values that you want to have and the qualities that you want others to recognize in you.  If how you’re feeling isn’t in line with those things, then it’s time to let go of jealousy thoughts and focus on living out your own values.
  4. Challenge your cognitive distortions: Cognitive distortions are like mind-tricks that we engage in that often involve irrational thoughts that can distort reality and lead to negative emotions.  Understanding these distortions can help you overcome jealousy by learning to approach issues from a more rational context. Challenging cognitive distortions involves recognizing irrational thought patterns and then practicing more rational and objective ways of thinking about situations and feelings.  For more information on cognitive distortions  check out the link above and the other posts in my series on the topic here, here, here, and here.
  5. Acknowledge feelings of jealousy:  When you acknowledge that you are feeling jealous, you can disempower that feeling.  People often deny being jealous, but that doesn’t usually help you feel any better.  This doesn’t mean you have to tell the person you are jealous of how you feel.  That may not be wise or productive, depending on the circumstances.  However, even if you just acknowledge it to yourself or another close friend, recognizing that you are having a natural emotion that needs to be dealt with can help you take control of the feeling and confront it.  Try to understand why you are feeling that way and what kinds of inadequacies you think you have that are triggering jealous feelings.  Then, practice the tips above to put the focus back on being your best self and dropping the comparisons.

 

Releasing the power that jealousy has on you can be an effective way to build your own confidence and let go of negative emotions.  Remember that the only person you need to be in competition with is yourself, and jealousy isn’t serving you in any positive way.  When we acknowledge our more unpleasant emotions and work to think about them in more logical and healthy ways, then we gain the benefits of having a higher emotional intelligence.  It’s not about denying that you ever feel jealous or pretending that you’re above it all.  It’s about acknowledging that you’re human with the same emotions as everybody else, but choosing to not be ruled by those emotions or let them drag you into a negative emotional state.

For more information on Emotional Intelligence, check out these posts:

How to Build Emotional Resilience

Are You Using Selective Self Control?

10 Ways to Practice Emotional Intelligence

Setting Boundaries

4 Steps for Anger Management

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