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5 Things to Ditch When You’re Feeling Depressed

5 Things to Ditch When You’re Feeling Depressed

Everyone has times in their life when they feel depressed, but clinical depression is more prolonged and intense than just having a sad day once in a while.  When you are in a depressive state, it can be a challenge to get out of, even when you’re tired of feeling bad all the time.

Most therapists and other helping people will encourage you to focus on positive experiences, thoughts, and people to help you get out of that depressive state and back to feeling good. However, it’s also helpful to think about some of the things that you can cut out of your life that might be contributing to your depression and making you feel worse.  It can be hard to get motivated to do the all the self-care you’re supposed to be doing when you’re in the midst of an intense depressive state.

Cutting some things out instead of adding more to your to-do list can be one strategy to combat depression and start to feel better, so that you actually have the energy to take care of yourself. Here are some things that you can safely ditch when you’re feeling depressed so that you have more time and energy to focus on yourself and get to feeling better:

1: Social Media

We all know that social media can be a place of comparison and drama when it’s not being used properly.  When you’re feeling depressed, social media can sometimes contribute to you feeling worse, especially if you get trapped into thinking that everyone’s lives seem better than yours or that other people seem to be happy and thriving while you’re not.

In reality, some people are putting their best faces, experiences, and attitudes forward on social media and not necessarily the full picture of their daily struggles.  Others might be constantly posting negativity, berating each other publicly, or starting arguments with little chance for resolution on public forums.  All of this can get overwhelming as you’re scrolling through your social feeds.

While it may be tempting to surf through all of your social platforms when you’re feeling down or bored, consider temporarily checking out of your social media profiles when you’re having a depressive episode.  The point is not to avoid people or the world in general, but you’ll be better off connecting with people in person who support you rather than spending too much time on social media when you’re feeling down.

2: Toxic People

Most of us know at least one toxic person, and possibly quite a few.  Toxic people are the ones that either contribute to all of the negativity in the world because they have negative energy overall, or those who directly speak or act in ways that are hurtful or damaging to those around them.  You probably know who the toxic people are in your life if you spend a bit of time thinking about it.  It could be the person at work who is always complaining about the office or their home life, or it could be that one friend who pretends to be supportive but in reality finds ways to cut you down or dismiss your feelings whenever given the chance.

If you have a toxic person in your life, feel free to limit your contact with them or cancel any plans you might have made if you are feeling depressed and know their energy would just make things worse.  This is all part of having healthy boundaries, and boundaries are part of self-care.  When you’re feeling depressed, cutting out time with negative, toxic people is part of getting through that depressive episode.  You don’t owe time or attention to people who negatively affect your mental health, even if they are among your friends and family.

3: Excess Clutter

Sometimes when you are feeling depressed, your physical possessions can tend to pile up and your space becomes a physical representation of how you feel inside.  Think of dishes taking over the kitchen, laundry taking over the living room, and clutter taking over your whole home.  The prospect of cleaning everything up seems overwhelming, and the whole mess contributes to how overwhelmed, sad, and unmotivated you feel.  The best strategy when this starts to happen is to tackle one thing at a time.

When you are depressed, you probably aren’t going to feel motivated to de-clutter all of your space, so think about just picking up one thing at a time.  When you walk to the bathroom, grab something to throw in the trash on the way or the laundry bin.  If you go to the kitchen to get a snack, put up one or two dishes from the dishwashing machine or wash one pot in the sink.  Don’t think you have to tackle it all at once, but recognize that one small bit of progress is not too overwhelming to manage, and doing one thing can create momentum.  You will likely feel somewhat better when your space isn’t overwhelming you too, so just focus on small tasks, and by the end of one day you will have made some progress.

4: Negative Self- Talk & Rumination

This can be a tough one to tackle, because the nature of depression is such that your mind finds ways to remind you of the negative outlook on almost everything that is happening, and it all gets tied in with the hopelessness and loss of motivation that you are already feeling.  However, ditching negative self-talk and negative rumination is one of the most powerful things that you can practice to help combat symptoms of depression.

First, you need to notice the thoughts that you are having that are negative and unhelpful. Recognize when you are engaging in thoughts patterns where you are ruminating on thoughts, people, or experiences that are not helping you to solve a problem or move past an issue.  When you are having repetitive thoughts, such as “I can’t do anything right, nothing I do will make a difference, everyone thinks negative things about me…”, then you need to take control over this thought pattern.

When you recognize these negative thought patterns, write down all of the negative things you are saying to yourself, and then directly challenge those thoughts.  Make an argument to yourself about why these thoughts are limiting you and make a conscious choice to change those thoughts in a more positive direction.  You can enlist the help of a good friend or confident, your therapist if you have one, or you can do it yourself.  But don’t let those thoughts go unchallenged, or they will take over your mental space and push you further into that depressive state.

5: Extra Obligations

We all have obligations that we have to meet in order to keep out lives on track and running smoothly.  Work, school, family obligations, and other responsibilities are a part of all of our lives.  Sometimes, though, you can afford to let go of some of the things you typically feel obligated to do, especially if you are someone who tends to over-commit yourself to others or take on more than you can reasonably handle.  If this is a problem you have, then these extra-obligations can feel like more opportunities for failure or letting people down, and when you’re depressed, that can take on extra significance.  When you are experiencing a depressive episode, however, this is a time to trim down your extra obligations and focus on getting your basic needs met.

If you have a partner that can pick up some of the slack, then enlist their help when possible.  If you need to cancel plans that feel too burdensome, that’s okay, just try to be conscientious and forthright towards people that you have made commitments to.  You don’t have to over-explain everything, but it’s okay to let people know that you’re not feeling well and you’re not able to meet those obligations you’ve committed to.

This is not to say that you can abandon all of your responsibilities.  If you start to just check out of everything, like taking too many days off work, not taking care of your children, or abandoning tasks that need to get done like paying bills then you might find yourself suffering from consequences that will make your depression worse.  This strategy is about ditching the excess stuff that you can do without, like too many social obligations or over-committing to extra projects.  If you find yourself struggling to complete necessary obligations that keep your life together, then it’s time to get some professional help with your depression.

Manage Depression by Focusing on One Thing At A Time

Managing depression usually requires multiple different strategies, and sometimes it feels like a beast that is too hard to tackle all at once.  You don’t have to give in to the sadness and fatigue, though.  Every day and every hour is a new opportunity to try something different, and it will be worth the effort you make to feel better.

When it seems like self-care is elusive or like no matter what you do you’re still feeling bad, then try to trim down what you’re focusing on.  Thinking about everything all at once can be too overwhelming, so just try to think about one strategy at a time and give yourself credit for that.  Abandoning your social media scrolling in favor of a walk outside or canceling dinner plans with that toxic person in favor of some time spent journaling or calling your more positive friend who lives across the country can make a difference in how you feel at the end of the day.